Toronto Star and the Power of Community

Picture 1.pngI’ve written before on the power of community and how Social Networks are bringing back the days of the small community within a large world. That’s why I was happy to hear in a recent interview I had with Erin MacLeod of the Toronto Star that BJ Fogg, Professor at Stanford, and teacher of the “Psychology of Facebook” class seemed to be on the same track (Fogg is also author of an excellent book on technology and marketing called “Persuasive Technology“). From the Toronto Star article,

“If you look at the history of civilization, you’re part of a community and as you grow up you stay connected with a community and those past lives and past friends,” Fogg says. “So maybe in some ways Facebook is bringing back what humans have lived with for thousands of years, a persistence of identity and relationships for decades.”

I agree wholeheartedly with Fogg. In the article I mention that it goes even further beyond that though. Technology always adds another layer to something that previously existed in a lesser form. With Social Networks, technology is simply bringing together a massive world of people into a small community-type atmosphere, but at the same time allowing a layer of privacy, giving users control over what that small community sees, and does not see.

It’s true that you will need to be more careful in the future with what you reveal on Social Networks, but the power of these Social Networks is that there are controls in place already to prevent information from getting out. Facebook has friends lists, privacy features, and flags you can enable and disable to control what elements are revealed to what people. You’ll find similar elements in other networks. I imagine even in Twitter (which I argue isn’t necessarily a “Social Network”, but rather a communications platform for Social Networks of people) will develop methods to segregate your friends and communicate only to whom you want.

At the same time, I feel we are becoming more forgiving of one another. We recognize through these mediums that we are all human, with flaws and imperfections, and that’s okay. Social Networks have power to make the world a better place.

Check out Fogg’s Psychology of Facebook class on Facebook here – he Ustreams it live every week!

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jessestay

Jesse Stay has been a pioneer in the space of social media marketing since before it was called "social media marketing". Originally a software developer, Jesse built a tool called SocialToo.com which helped brands like Pepsi, Brittany Spears, and MC Hammer grow their social media presence, and before he knew it brands were coming to him for help to grow their presence in very unique ways. His tool was featured on almost every tech blog and even mainstream news sites like New York Times, Techcrunch, and Mashable. Jesse also spent a brief period working FOR Facebook, Inc., helping them to build out their documentation to help companies integrate Facebook Connect into their websites and mobile apps. Jesse took his skills and helped the LDS Church kick off most of its social media programs. While there he helped launch the award-winning "I'm a Mormon" marketing campaign with global reach worldwide in the millions of views and followers. Jesse established new global programs at the Church to further grow its reach amongst both members and non-members of the Church, working with every department of the Church, also including entities like the Mormon Tabernacle Choir and Brigham Young University. He also helped the Church navigate its voice and presence during the Mitt Romney Presidential campaign due to the significant attention the Church was getting at the time. He established the social media advertising techniques and strategies employed at Deseret Digital Media growing over 20 million fans across their news properties in just 6 months, and was featured on AdWeek for his success. As founder and Principal of Stay N Alive, Jesse has developed very unique techniques in social media advertising to help organizations grow presences, within months on minimal budgets, into hundreds of thousands of highly relevant and engaging fans and followers. He designed and teaches social media advertising at LDS Business College. He has helped grow sales, and has a belief that yes, you CAN measure social! Jesse has been featured as one of 10 entrepreneurs to follow on Twitter (next to Biz Stone and Ev Williams, founders of Twitter) by Entrepreneur magazine. Jesse has written 9 books on the topic of social media marketing and development, including Google+ Marketing For Dummies and Facebook All In One For Dummies, and eats, lives, and drinks social media with a personal combined presence of over 600,000 followers on his personal social profiles.

0 thoughts on “Toronto Star and the Power of Community”

  1. Jesse,

    Thanks for the great article.

    Relationships in Facebook and other social networks are a bit odd. We're in a transitional phase where technology is allowing us to do some new things with relationships but it hasn't become sophisticated enough to give us a good way to manage those relationships.

    We need easy ways to pick what matters and filter out what doesn't. It's like we're in the catepillar stage waiting to metamorphisize into something that will be more useful and will forge stronger ties.

    BJ Fogg
    Stanford Persuasive Technology Lab

  2. Jesse,

    Thanks for the great article.

    Relationships in Facebook and other social networks are a bit odd. We're in a transitional phase where technology is allowing us to do some new things with relationships but it hasn't become sophisticated enough to give us a good way to manage those relationships.

    We need easy ways to pick what matters and filter out what doesn't. It's like we're in the catepillar stage waiting to metamorphisize into something that will be more useful and will forge stronger ties.

    BJ Fogg
    Stanford Persuasive Technology Lab

  3. BJ – thanks for commenting! I'm a huge fan of yours. I agree – it is all very immature at the moment, and it will be very interesting to see what becomes of it, who the leaders will be, and what we'll be able to become because of it.

  4. BJ – thanks for commenting! I'm a huge fan of yours. I agree – it is all very immature at the moment, and it will be very interesting to see what becomes of it, who the leaders will be, and what we'll be able to become because of it.

  5. Jesse,

    Thanks for the great article.

    Relationships in Facebook and other social networks are a bit odd. We're in a transitional phase where technology is allowing us to do some new things with relationships but it hasn't become sophisticated enough to give us a good way to manage those relationships.

    We need easy ways to pick what matters and filter out what doesn't. It's like we're in the catepillar stage waiting to metamorphisize into something that will be more useful and will forge stronger ties.

    BJ Fogg
    Stanford Persuasive Technology Lab

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